Book Report: Lost Science

lost-science-coverFerguson has really done a tremendous job researching her subjects and bringing them to life, including enough detail to make things very vivid without overwhelming the reader, and putting everything into context by explaining the focal scientist’s contemporaries, political environment, other interests, and so on. These aren’t dry listings of historical facts; instead, they’re entertaining and enthralling true-but-almost-unbelievable tales that drew me in and carried me away.

Title: Lost Science – Astonishing Tales of Forgotten Genius

Author: Kitty Ferguson

Publisher: Sterling

Publication Date: 2017

Origin/Intention: I just wanted to learn about some interesting and little-known scientists (and the associated science). The more you know, right?

Summary: Lost Science is a collection of biographical tales, each of which focuses on one scientist, touching on the scientist’s life, research, contemporaries, lasting impact, and reasons for his or her relative obscurity.

Part I, Ripping Yarns, is about “outrageously adventurous tales, riveting because the colorful people in the are irrepressible risk-takers, spies, scoundrels, and heroes”:

Part II, In the Shadows, “features people who were essential to major advances but failed to receive the credit they deserved, who are lost in the shadows of celebrated colleagues – or, more curiously, lost in their own shadows”:

Part III, Forgotten Firsts, “is about achievements, discoveries, and lines of discovery that many of us might recognize while having no idea who actually got their first:

My Take: Lost Science was an absolute delight to read: the subject matter is interesting, the storytelling is top-notch, and the collection as a whole is a wonderful assortment of characters.

Ferguson has really done a tremendous job researching her subjects and bringing them to life, including enough detail to make things very vivid without overwhelming the reader, and putting everything into context by explaining the focal scientist’s contemporaries, political environment, other interests, and so on.

These aren’t dry listings of historical facts; instead, they’re entertaining and enthralling true-but-almost-unbelievable tales that drew me in and carried me away.

Would it be too much to ask for a Volume 2???

Read This Book If: …You like science, history, or amazing biographies, whether alone or in some combination.

Lee Brooks is a freelance technology marketer based in the high-tech hub of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Books, Everything, Math and Science

What do *you* think?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address and get posts delivered straight to your inbox.

Archives
%d bloggers like this: